Borough mayor to launch St George's day carnival

THE Mayor of Dudley will officially launch the borough's St George's day carnival on Saturday April 20 at 10.45pm.

The ceremony will follow a parade featuring representatives fro a wide variety of organisations including Sedgley Morris Men, The Black Country Living Museum, Dudley Zoo, Quarry Bank Royal British Legion, Cradley Royal British Legion, Worcesters and Sherwood Forresters, Halesowen and District Beaver Scouts and the RAF Association.

The parade will start at 10.30am at the Dudley Council House on Priory Road which will head to Market Place where the mayor will start the celebrations.

Councillor Melvyn Mottram, Mayor of Dudley, said: “Dudley Council’s 2013 St George’s Day Celebrations are our biggest and most ambitious yet. I’m really looking forward to working with all the community groups, organisations and businesses who have so generously donated their time and prizes."

Performers at the carnival will include the Sedgley Morris Men, Time Step Dance Studio, Daniel Salt acoustic ukulele, Jayne and Shelley’s Dance Depo, Adam Martin acoustic, Ren Shin Kan Aikido Club and Devil’s Advocate Rock Band.

Stone Street Square will be playing host to free small fairground rides and face painting, stands by Dudley Zoological Gardens, Dudley Canal Trust and Limestone Mines and Brierley Hill Musical Theatre.

There will also be a barrel organ and the Great Dudley Bake-Off competition which will be judged at 12.30pm with the cakes sold in aid of the mayor’s charities from 1pm.

Dudley Museum will host a free princess and knight badge making sessions from 10.30am to 3.30pm for youngsters while Dudley Town Hall will host a free tea dance from 1pm to 3pm.

Dudley Library will be busy with Punch and Judy shows at 10.15am, 1.15pm and 3.15pm, glitter tattoos from 10.30am to 11.30am and 2.30 to 3.30pm, a Dragon Egg Hunt and craft activity from 11am to 12noon and a professional storyteller from noon to 1pm and 2pm to 3pm.

There will also be a display by Oldbury Squadron Air Training Corps on St James’s Road at 1.15pm.

The deputy mayor will be judging the best dressed shop and market stall competition from 1pm.

Pay and display parking will available on Priory Road, Flood Street, Stafford Street and the Trident Shopping Centre on Wolverhampton Street. Although Priory Road will be closed in the morning the car park will be open.

There will be a series of road closures throughout the day. For more infomation visit www.dudley.gov.uk/see-and-do

Comments (2)

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9:32pm Fri 19 Apr 13

QBforever says...

"The Mayor of Dudley"; not quite, like all mayors, he is a councillor chosen by his fellow councillors. The people of Dudley get no say, indeed the council has refused to hold any kind of public vote for the post of mayor. As such he is the "Mayor of Dudley Council", rather than the "Mayor of Dudley"!
"The Mayor of Dudley"; not quite, like all mayors, he is a councillor chosen by his fellow councillors. The people of Dudley get no say, indeed the council has refused to hold any kind of public vote for the post of mayor. As such he is the "Mayor of Dudley Council", rather than the "Mayor of Dudley"! QBforever
  • Score: 0

11:22pm Fri 19 Apr 13

Cllr Ray Burston says...

Qbforever - you are confused about the nature of the role of Mayor of Dudley.

The Mayoralty in Dudley Borough is not a position that brings with it wide-ranging tax-raising or decision-making powers - like, for example, those enjoyed by Boris Johnson as Mayor of London, or that the mayors of many big American cities also have at their disposal. If it were, then it would be only right and proper that such an individual should announce a manifesto detailing what he or she proposes to do with those powers and then submits him or herself to a ballot of the citizens over whom he or she will exercise them.

Instead, the Mayor of Dudley has no decision-making powers and the office he bears is purely a ceremonial one which, by tradition, is conferred upon the next longest-serving councillor, who will be 'elected' to it by his fellow councillors at the Annual Council Meeting each May.

In return, the Mayor forsakes any party political role and commits himself to his first task, which is to chair the main meetings of the Council and ensure that debates are conducted fairly and impartially - in much the same way that the Speaker of the House of Commons chairs meetings in that particular chamber.

Secondly, protocol determines that the Mayor is Dudley's First Citizen. As such, his role is also to formally welcome and entertain important visitors to the Borough - including royal visitors.

Finally, most of the Mayor's year in office will be devoted to his third (and arguably most demanding) task: supporting the many good and charitable causes that are undertaken in the Borough - usually by attending and lending the prestige of his presence to their fund-raising events, but also by formally acknowledging and thanking their many volunteers who work so hard to make Dudley a better place for us all. The Mayor will also select charities of his own to promote, for which he will raise many thousands of pounds.

Therefore, being Mayor of Dudley has always been regarded amongst we councillors as an honour and a privilege; certainly not a sinecure to be fought over, nor an ego-trip to be paraded. Indeed, I can attest that being 'elected' Mayor is actually one of the most humbling and yet edifying experiences that any councillor can offer himself up to.

To date, all the mayors I have had the good fortune to have worked with - including our present Mayor - have conducted themselves in office with an exemplary sense of duty and selflessness, having each brought qualities of their own to the role that have enabled them to touch the lives of thousands of their fellow citizens. And let us not forget either the contributions of their mayoresses and consorts, many of whom never sought the limelight and often struggled with it, yet who have loyally given service to this Borough even so.

Hopefully this explains the role a little more clearly.
Qbforever - you are confused about the nature of the role of Mayor of Dudley. The Mayoralty in Dudley Borough is not a position that brings with it wide-ranging tax-raising or decision-making powers - like, for example, those enjoyed by Boris Johnson as Mayor of London, or that the mayors of many big American cities also have at their disposal. If it were, then it would be only right and proper that such an individual should announce a manifesto detailing what he or she proposes to do with those powers and then submits him or herself to a ballot of the citizens over whom he or she will exercise them. Instead, the Mayor of Dudley has no decision-making powers and the office he bears is purely a ceremonial one which, by tradition, is conferred upon the next longest-serving councillor, who will be 'elected' to it by his fellow councillors at the Annual Council Meeting each May. In return, the Mayor forsakes any party political role and commits himself to his first task, which is to chair the main meetings of the Council and ensure that debates are conducted fairly and impartially - in much the same way that the Speaker of the House of Commons chairs meetings in that particular chamber. Secondly, protocol determines that the Mayor is Dudley's First Citizen. As such, his role is also to formally welcome and entertain important visitors to the Borough - including royal visitors. Finally, most of the Mayor's year in office will be devoted to his third (and arguably most demanding) task: supporting the many good and charitable causes that are undertaken in the Borough - usually by attending and lending the prestige of his presence to their fund-raising events, but also by formally acknowledging and thanking their many volunteers who work so hard to make Dudley a better place for us all. The Mayor will also select charities of his own to promote, for which he will raise many thousands of pounds. Therefore, being Mayor of Dudley has always been regarded amongst we councillors as an honour and a privilege; certainly not a sinecure to be fought over, nor an ego-trip to be paraded. Indeed, I can attest that being 'elected' Mayor is actually one of the most humbling and yet edifying experiences that any councillor can offer himself up to. To date, all the mayors I have had the good fortune to have worked with - including our present Mayor - have conducted themselves in office with an exemplary sense of duty and selflessness, having each brought qualities of their own to the role that have enabled them to touch the lives of thousands of their fellow citizens. And let us not forget either the contributions of their mayoresses and consorts, many of whom never sought the limelight and often struggled with it, yet who have loyally given service to this Borough even so. Hopefully this explains the role a little more clearly. Cllr Ray Burston
  • Score: 0

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