Brierley Hill engineer invited to Parliament in prestigious competition

Edward Davies

Edward Davies

First published in News

A BRIERLEY Hill engineer has been invited to Parliament as part of a prestigious competition which highlights the talents of the country's future scientific leaders.

Edward Davies, aged 30, a research associate at Imperial College London, has been shortlisted from hundreds of applicants to present his engineering research to politicians and a panel of expert judges as part of SET for Britain on Monday March 17.

Edward’s poster on research about improving accelerometers using mechanical amplification will be judged against the work of dozens of other engineers in the competition - which is run by the Parliamentary and Scientific Committee and a host of scientific bodies.

He said: “I have always been excited about science and how it has become part of our everyday lives.

"This is an excellent opportunity to show how research does this to a wide and influential audience."

The former Thorns Community College and King Edward VI College student, who is funded by AWE plc, added: "I also believe it is important to raise the ambitions of pupils from state schools.

"I hope my attendance shows what can be achieved with enough hard work and intelligence.”

Andrew Miller MP, chairman of the Parliamentary and Scientific Committee, said, “This annual competition is an important date in the parliamentary calendar because it gives MPs an opportunity to speak to a wide range of the country’s best young researchers.

“These early career engineers, mathematicians and scientists are the architects of our future and SET for Britain is politicians’ best opportunity to meet them and understand their work.”

Edward’s research has been entered into the engineering session of the competition, which will be judged by leading academics.

The event, the only one of its kind in the country, boasts a top prize of £3,000 and it aims to encourage and support Britain's early-career research scientists, engineers, technologists and mathematicians who are likely to be at the forefront of future scientific developments.

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